Hip PNF Kicks

Outside of your core muscles, the hips are probably the most important muscle group in the golf swing. They help your hips to twist and also transfer all of your leg strength up into the trunk muscles. It’s that energy transfer that helps to send that little white ball farther down the fairway. Most golfers who workout do work on their hip strength. The unfortunate part is that most are going about it all the wrong way.

The hip joint is a very dynamic joint. It is a ball and socket joint just like the shoulder.

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The great thing about the hip joint is that it can move in almost any plane due to its kinematics (scrabble word, 800pts). That allows for all the movements that happen during the golf swing. Most people think there is just a twist at the hip. The truth is there is a natural twist, squat, and lateral shift happening at the same time in the golf swing. If it happens during the golf swing why wouldn’t you train that way?

When most golfers hit the gym they might do squats/deadlifts, and some lateral walk or side lunge. Awesome! I’m not saying those are bad to do. I certainly do them when I go to the gym. What I think is important is to incorporate all the movements of the hip joint into one exercise. That way when you make a golf swing your body has been trained to moving through all those planes of movement and can transfer that energy more efficiently. That will equal more power into the golf ball, and hopefully a lot more distance.

So I’ve teased you enough. You are probably saying at this point “what exercise does all this at once? That sounds like an infomercial.” PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation) patterns are the way to go. They are simple patterns that move the hip through all the ranges of movement in one movement. Here is a quick video that will show you how to go through the patterns on your own.


I prefer that clients do it without holding on if they can. That way you are working on balance as well which is also very important in the golf swing. I also will have people start with moving slow so you have to own the movement. Once that gets easy add some speed to it. Just don’t move so fast that you start to lose your balance and fall over. If you can’t do it with the resistance band at first that is okay. Just work on the patterns without resistance until it gets easy.  

You will definitely feel the burn in your hips when you do these exercises (take that Jane Fonda). Work on this over the off season and see how much farther you hit that golf ball once winter is over.

OrthoCore Physical Therapy has convenient locations in Westerly and North Kingstown, RI. For more information on our services please call (401) 667-0131






Knee Arthritis vs. Meniscus Tear

I’ve had a lot of patients throughout the years with knee pain (I know, earth shattering beginning to a blog post). The biggest thing that we do as Physical Therapists is figure out what is the cause of your pain. I feel like I’ve had a group of patients recently, that have knee pain and their MRI shows they have a meniscus tear…and arthritis. The problem with having both is it makes it hard to discern where the pain is coming from because they are so closely related. The other problem with having both is that surgeons are usually shy about performing a meniscectomy (remove the torn meniscus) because it may not relieve your pain symptoms. That being said, let’s talk about the differences between the two so you can make an educated decision if this is what you are dealing with.

What is a Meniscus Tear?

The meniscus is the shock absorber of your knee. You have one on the inside (medial) and outside (lateral) of your knee. If you were looking down from the top of your knee they look like two lima beans. If you look at them from a straight on view they look like a race car track meaning the peripheral portions are thicker and it slopes down towards the middle of the knee from there.

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Typically a torn meniscus will hurt right over the joint line and will be sore at end ranges of knee movement. It will also usually hurt with activity, especially loading and twisting. Remember, its your shock absorber, so the more bumps you take the more strain you are putting on it. Think of it like driving a car. If you go over a lot of bumps you will feel it more.

When you have a torn meniscus the surgeon will usually just cut out the torn portion, which is usually on the inner portion. That way they can take the torn tissue, while still leaving a lot of meniscus for you to play with.

Recovery is usually quick (if you have a good PT) and you are usually back to your normal activities in a couple months time.

What is Knee Arthritis?

Arthritis is a loss of cartilage. Cartilage is like the shiny end of a chicken bone. When cartilage slides on cartilage, no problem, when it starts to wear down is when bone gets exposed and can lead to inflammation and pain.

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Arthritis is usually worse in the morning and at night. During the day, if you keep your knee moving without much impact, it usually makes the joint feel better. Activities like biking, swimming, non-impact weight lifting are good.

Arthritic pain is usually more global, meaning it’s hard to pinpoint with your finger. Sometimes it hurts in one area. The next day it could hurt in a completely different area. It depends on how much arthritis you have and what types of activities you are doing.

The surgical solution for arthritis is a knee replacement which isn’t as easy to recover from as a meniscectomy obviously. Recovery from a knee replacement is 3-6 months (back to activity with some pain) with full recovery usually by a year.

How do I know what to do?

So what do you do if you go see a doctor only to find out that you have a meniscus tear AND knee arthritis? The best thing to do is start to write down where you have pain in your knee and when. If you start to see that it is more over the joint line, and more with jumping/twisting activities, it’s probably coming from your meniscus. If you find that it is more painful in the morning, but gets better as the day goes along, and not in a consistent spot, it’s probably arthritis.

I would always recommend trying a course of PT first. In both cases there have been plenty of studies that show that PT can be effective without requiring surgical intervention. If PT doesn’t help and it appears to be more meniscus, if it were my knee, I would have the surgery. If PT doesn’t help and it appears to be more arthritis, it depends on what I would recommend. A knee replacement is a much bigger surgery, but is also really effective for relieving knee pain. It is really age related but I will say this … most patients that I have, that have had knee replacement surgery, say they wish they had done it sooner.

I hope this helps to give you an idea of why your knee hurts and what you can do about it. If you have any questions please comment below. If you would like to schedule an evaluation to see what might be causing your knee pain, please contact us at OrthoCore Physical Therapy  401-667-0131 to make an appointment at our Westerly or North Kingstown locations.




Foot Pain Due to Flat Feet

I know this comes as no surprise but I’ve been treating a lot of feet lately. Apparently when you open a second office with a Podiatrist that is bound to happen. A majority of feet problems that I see are due to flat feet. About 12% of the population have flat feet. That might not seem like a lot but when you consider the amount of people in the world, that’s a lot of fallen arches.

Most foot problems, that are due to flat feet, stem from weakness in the arches of the feet. There are a group of 9 small muscles in the foot that help to create and maintain the shape of the arch.

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Just like any other muscle in the body, if you don’t use it you lose it. The hard part about people with flat feet is that the muscles are constantly on stretch. A muscles that is constantly stretched, is going to be weak. So you are really fighting an uphill battle. The other difficult part for most people is they don’t know how to strengthen their feet. What do you do? Put a tiny dumbbell around your toes and do curls? As much as I would love to see people try that, it wouldn’t be effective. Here is one of my favorite exercises to do to strengthen the intrinsic muscles of the foot (crazy socks not required, but recommended).

If you perform this exercise regularly it will help to strengthen the foot muscles and start to build up your arch. If you have a really flat foot, I also recommend wearing a foot orthotic to give a little extra support and bring the arch up to where it belongs.

I hope this helps to keep your piggies from aching and get you up and on those feet pain free. If you have any questions please contact us . Thanks for reading!