Facet Joint Back Pain

I treat a lot of people with back pain. The hard part about treating patients with back pain is getting the work we do on the table, to translate to standing and walking. Patients who are older (I’m talking 35+) will usually have pain due to a facet issue, degeneration in the back, or both. Lying down is a great position for those issues because it doesn’t put pressure on the back. Once you stand up, the back compresses, puts pressure on the joints, and the pain returns. If this sounds like you, let me give you a simple solution to provide you with some relief for your back pain with standing.

What’s a Facet Joint?

Unless you went to PT school, or some form of medical school, you have no clue what a facet is or what degeneration looks like in your back. Well...that is what I’m here for. Let me school you on some anatomy. Facet joints are the joints of the spine. Just like any other joint in the body, the spine moves. It requires joints to allow that to happen. In your spine you have facet joints on each side of every vertebrae from your head to your hips.

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Like all your other joints, the facet joint can get inflamed. When you compress an inflamed joint, it hurts. Facet joints get compressed when you are standing and when you extend. Hence the reason why lying down feels better, and standing hurts.

What do I do for Standing?

Since most of us can’t lie around all day, what do we do when we’re standing to help alleviate back pain? The key to having less pain with standing is understanding the position of your pelvis. Most of us have what is called an anterior tilt at our pelvis. That means that the front of our pelvis sits lower than the back part of our pelvis.

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Speaking in generalities, this usually happens because our hip flexors are tight and our abdominals are weak. In the game of tug-of-war, a tight muscle always beats a weak muscle. In therapy we will try to stretch the hip flexors, and strengthen the abdominals to correct the imbalance. That doesn’t always carry over to a standing position though. Sometimes, you have learned to stand like that so you need to retrain the brain to stand in a neutral pelvis. What is the best way to do that? Train your hips in a standing position. Here is a simple exercise that I like to give my patients that have back pain with standing.

Give this a try to help alleviate your back pain with standing. You can perform as many of these as you want. The exercise is meant to help you retrain your brains standing pattern. There is no resistance involved so you don’t have to worry about overdoing it.

I hope this helps correct your back pain you are getting with standing. If you have any questions please contact us. If you want a free session to review how to perform the exercise properly just mention this post and OrthoCore will give you a free 15 min session at any of our clinics. Thank you for reading!